TV channel pulls Jaws from its schedule after UK veteran dies in horror shark attack

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A TV station has pulled Jaws from its schedule following a horror attack by a great white shark that left a British veteran dead.

Simon Nellist, 35, from Penzance, tragically died off Little Bay, Sydney, on Wednesday after being attacked by a four-and-a-half-metre shark.

The city’s beaches were closed for safety reasons after what was the first fatal shark attack in nearly 60 years.

Steven Spielberg’s iconic 1975 hit Jaws was due to air on Nine Network’s 9GB digital multichannel the following day, but was pulled as news of the tragedy made headlines in Australia and around the world.



Simon Nellist, 35, of Penzance, was killed in a shark attack on Wednesday

The thriller, based on a 1974 novel by Peter Benchley, follows beachgoers in the United States as a resort town is terrorized by a man-eating great white.

Carnage sees Roy Scheider’s character, Police Chief Martin Brody, hunt the beast with the help of a marine biologist and a professional shark hunter (played by Richard Dreyfuss and Robert Shaw respectively).

The Australian television channel instead opted to screen the 2002 action thriller xXx in its 7:30 p.m. slot on Thursday.



follows beachgoers across the United States as a resort town is terrorized by a man-eating great white
Jaws follows beachgoers across the United States as a resort town is terrorized by a man-eating great white

Following Wednesday’s incident, heartbreaking reports emerged that Nellist was set to marry the woman of his dreams, bride-to-be Jenny Ho.

Tributes also poured in from the dive instructor’s family and friends.

His pal Della Ross said: “Everything about Simon, to me, is about the ocean. The news hit us like a truck, he’s one of those people who really makes the world a better place.”



Simon Nellist, 35, of Penzance, was killed in a shark attack on Wednesday
Sydney’s beaches were closed after Nellist’s death

Today a disturbing theory has emerged as to why Nellist was targeted by the enormous Great White.

He wore a wetsuit at the time – which beachgoers say the avid swimmer has always done – and it’s been suggested his choice of clothing could have meant he looked like a seal for the shark.

Dr Chris Pepin-Neff, author of the book Flaws: Shark Bites and Emotional Public Policymaking, told news.com.au it was “not crazy” for sharks to confuse humans with other mammals from this way.

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